Sexual Assault & Harassment

Sexual Assault & Harassment

Everyone deserves to be free from sexual assault, harassment, and other forms of sexual violence.

Everyone deserves to be free from sexual assault, harassment, and other forms of sexual violence.

Sexual violence can happen to anyone. But women, LGBTQ people, people with disabilities, and people of color are more likely to experience sexual assault than other people.

Sexual assault is the use of force, coercion, or an imbalance of power to make a person engage in sexual activity. Rape is one form of sexual assault, but it’s not the only kind. Sexual assault can include forced kissing, touching, and groping. 

Sexual harassment means unwanted, inappropriate sexual advances, including suggestive gestures, language, or touching. Often, it’s used as a way to humiliate, insult, or degrade someone, or it’s done by someone who shouldn’t be making sexual advances — like your boss, a teacher, or someone else who has more power than you, even if it's just more social power. 

Some of the most effective ways to address sexual violence include building a culture of consent and respect; helping people communicate about sex, consent, and healthy relationships; and providing resources to help survivors of sexual violence feel supported — rather than brushed off, disbelieved, or blamed. The fact is, we cannot be truly equal until our bodies are our own.

One in five American women has been raped in her lifetime.

Source

Nearly half of all transgender individuals are sexually assaulted at some point in their lives.

Source

What can
you do?

Here are a few things you can do right now.

sign & share the manifesto

Learn more about sexual harassment, assault, and other forms of sexual violence from one of our partner organizations: National Domestic Workers Alliance, Alianza Alianza Nacional de Campesinas, Me Too / Time’s Up, RAINN.

Next issue:

Equal Pay

Sexual Assault & Harassment

Everyone deserves to be free from sexual assault, harassment, and other forms of sexual violence.

Everyone deserves to be free from sexual assault, harassment, and other forms of sexual violence.

Sexual violence can happen to anyone. But women, LGBTQ people, people with disabilities, and people of color are more likely to experience sexual assault than other people.

Sexual assault is the use of force, coercion, or an imbalance of power to make a person engage in sexual activity. Rape is one form of sexual assault, but it’s not the only kind. Sexual assault can include forced kissing, touching, and groping. 

Sexual harassment means unwanted, inappropriate sexual advances, including suggestive gestures, language, or touching. Often, it’s used as a way to humiliate, insult, or degrade someone, or it’s done by someone who shouldn’t be making sexual advances — like your boss, a teacher, or someone else who has more power than you, even if it's just more social power. 

Some of the most effective ways to address sexual violence include building a culture of consent and respect; helping people communicate about sex, consent, and healthy relationships; and providing resources to help survivors of sexual violence feel supported — rather than brushed off, disbelieved, or blamed. The fact is, we cannot be truly equal until our bodies are our own.

One in five American women has been raped in her lifetime.

Source

Nearly half of all transgender individuals are sexually assaulted at some point in their lives.

Source

What can
you do?

Here are a few things you can do right now.

sign & share the manifesto

Learn more about sexual harassment, assault, and other forms of sexual violence from one of our partner organizations: National Domestic Workers Alliance, Alianza Alianza Nacional de Campesinas, Me Too / Time’s Up, RAINN.

Next issue:

Equal Pay

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